College of Health and Science

Biology (BIO)

BIO 100   Biology Today3 credits

This course challenges students to confront, evaluate, and integrate the major discoveries and principles of the biological sciences within their worldview as members of contemporary society. Major themes of the course include the role of genes and inheritance in human growth and development; health and behavior; human origin and relationship to the Earth's biodiversity; and human impact on, role within, and responsibility for the integrity of the biosphere. Lectures, readings, discussions, films, and laboratory activities comprise the course. (Prerequisites: none. Students planning further study in biology or other natural sciences should complete BIO 120 and BIO 130.)

BIO 102   Biology in a Box4 credits

This augmented course challenges students to confront, evaluate, and integrate the major discoveries and principles of the biological sciences within their worldview as members of contemporary society. The course incorporates hands-on experiments and activities to aid in learning core concepts in biology. All required materials can be purchased as a single lab kit that comes straight to your home - in a box! Learn about biology from the tiniest cellular viewpoint all the way up to the larger scale, whole world ecological viewpoint.

BIO 120   Biology I: The Unity of Life4 credits

This course emphasizes inquiry and investigation while introducing students to the unifying theories of modern biological science. Topics considered include foundational mechanisms of matter, energy, cells, genetics, and reproduction. The course is comprised of lectures, readings, discussions, written assignments, online assignments, and a laboratory component. (Recommended prerequisites: one year of high school biology and chemistry and four years of high school mathematics)

BIO 130   Biology II: The Diversity of Life4 credits

This course evaluates the current hypotheses explaining the origin, development, and maintenance of the Earth's biodiversity. The major lineages of life are surveyed and compared at the organismal level by considering evolutionary relationships between structure and function. The course is comprised of lectures, readings, discussions, written assignments, online assignments, and a laboratory component. (Recommended prerequisites: one year of high school biology and chemistry and four years of high school mathematics)

BIO 210   Genetics4 credits

This course focuses on the principles of heredity and the molecular concepts regarding the genome. Major topics include Mendelian genetics, sex linkage, extranuclear inheritance, chromosomal aberrations, structure and function of DNA, regulation of gene expression, mutation, and modern DNA technologies. Problem solving and quantitative reasoning are emphasized . (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in BIO 120)

BIO 220   Plant Biology4 credits

This course is a study of botany based primarily upon morphological and physiological concepts and principles. Major topics include the plant cell; the ontogeny, structure and physiology of plant tissues and organs; and the forms, phylogeny and life cycles of representative plant groups. Three lecture/demonstration sessions and one two-hour laboratory period per week. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in BIO 120 and BIO 130)

BIO 230   Animal Biology and Physiology4 credits

This course provides a comparative study of major animal groups within a taxonomic, morphological and physiological framework. Major topics include animal cells, animal tissues, organ systems, animal phylogeny, life cycles and development. Three lecture sessions and one three hour laboratory period per week. (Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in BIO 120)

BIO 300   Microbiology4 credits

Did you know that our world is covered in microorganisms? This course explores the diversity of the microbial world, providing overviews on bacteria, Archaea, viruses, fungi, and protozoans. A major emphasis is placed on how microorganisms cause disease, how the human body attempts to prevent disease, and how we can treat infectious disease. Other topics include microbial growth, metabolism, genetics, and environmental and food microbiology. The lab consists of a series of classic microbiology experiments that teach students how to visualize, culture, quantify, and identify microorganisms. A short self-directed research project allows students to design and implement their own experiment. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in BIO 120)

BIO 315   Human Anatomy and Physiology I4 credits

This course is part one of a study of the structure and function of the human body. Major topics include the introduction to the human body, cells, tissues and skeletal, muscle, nervous and cardiovascular systems. Three lectures and one three hour lab period per week. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in BIO 120)

BIO 316   Human Anatomy and Physiology II4 credits

This course is part two of a study of the structure and function of the human body. Major topics include the autonomic nerves and special senses and endocrine, respiratory, digestive, immune, metabolism, reproductive and urinary systems. Three lectures and one three hour lab period per week. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in BIO 120 or instructor consent)

BIO 330   Cell Biology4 credits

This course is a study of the structure and function of eukaryotic cells from a molecular viewpoint. Major topics include molecular cell structure, metabolism, membrane transport, cell signaling, cell division and cancer, stem cells and tissue differentiation. Students read and discuss the ethical implications of biomedical research in the context of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. The lab focuses on cell culture technique and requires students to design and implement a self-directed mini research project. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in BIO 120)

BIO 340   Science Issues and Ethics4 credits

This course includes a short introduction to the study of philosophy and ethics, followed by critical analyses of current issues in health and environmental sciences. Ethical discussions are framed in a solid understanding of the science behind each topic. The course will include a variety of formats, including reading and reviewing papers and/or texts, analyzing case studies, and participating in class discussions. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in BIO 120 and CHE 115).

BIO 350   Medical Terminology2 credits

This course will help students learn the components of medical terms. Students will learn the basic elements of words, such as roots, prefixes, suffixes, combining vowels, and combining forms in order to understand, the word's meaning. Students will be able to apply the meaning of the word to an anatomical structure, physiological function or pathology, the course will be mainly online but with several scheduled face-to-face meetings for discussion and examination.

BIO 415   Biology of Aging3 credits

This 3 credit course will focus on theories of human aging from a biological perspective. The structural and functional changes that occur during the aging process will be investigated at several levels: molecular, cellular, tissue, and organ system. The symptoms and clinical management of age-related diseases will also be explored. This course is targeted for students interested in the health sciences and is required for the gerontology minor/certification. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in BIO 120 (preferred) OR BIO 100)

BIO 430   Immunology4 credits

This course provides a comprehensive study of the immune system. Major topics include passive immunity, cell-mediated immunity, humoral immunity, autoimmune diseases, vaccination strategies and other medically relevant topics. (Prerequisite: BIO 120)

BIO 440   Human Gross Anatomy4 credits

This course is a comprehensive study of human anatomy which includes dissection of a human cadaver. Skeletal, muscular, nervous, digestive, cardiovascular, respiratory, and urogenital systems will be covered, and emphasis will be placed on the relatedness of structure and function.

BIO 450   Special Topics in Biology1 credit

The topic for this course will vary each semester, chosen from a wide range of current research in biology. Students will read background material, participate in discussions and complete writing assignments as directed by the instructor. This course will meet for one lecture/discussion hour per week. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in BIO 120)

BIO 456   Research in Biology1-4 credits

This course offers students an opportunity to do original research in an area of expertise of one of the biology faculty members. When applicable, the research will be followed with presentation of a poster or a paper at a research symposium. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in BIO 120)

BIO 460   Neuroscience4 credits

This course introduces the rapid growing field of neuroscience. The course covers topics ranging from neuronal structure and function, synaptic communication and signaling, gross organization of the brain and spinal cord, to sensory and motor responses as well as higher functions such as learning, memory, and cognition.

BIO 488   Independent Study1-4 credits

Independent Study courses can be designed by the student and instructor to meet special needs. Presently offered as independent study are Scientific Presentation and Bottle Biology, both one credit experiences.

BIO 497   Biology Teaching Assistant1-4 credits

Students enrolled in this course will work with a faculty member to gain teaching experience in biology courses. Activities may include: designing laboratory exercises; working with students in laboratory, classroom and tutoring environment; preparing and delivering lectures; developing course materials; and grading.

BIO 498   Biology Internship1-16 credits

This internship is designed to provide students with a work/educational experience which will help them determine their future educational and occupational goals.